Japanese Media Attacks TWICE’s Dahyun And MONSTA X Amidst High Political Tension

The shirts they wore in the past became an issue.

With heightened tensions between the Japanese and Korean government, there has been a large number of political issues arising about K-Pop idols promoting in Japan. AsahiTV recently postponed BTS‘s performance on Music Station after stating that Jimin‘s shirt depicting an atomic bomb became an issue in Japan.

jimin bts japan asahi tv

BigHit Entertainment later explained the true meaning behind the shirt and offered a formal apology to those who were offended by the depicted image.

 

It appears the controversy has yet to end as Japanese press began criticizing TWICE’s Dahyun for wearing a shirt that supported justice for comfort women.

twice dahyun comfort women shirt

They claimed that Dahyun wore a shirt that endorsed the “unreasonable” activities in support for the Comfort Women in Korea. They demanded NHK to forbid TWICE from attending Kohaku Uta Gassen this year. TWICE became the first K-Pop girl group to be invited to the show for two consecutive years.

Japan and Korea have long been at odds about the issue regarding Comfort Women, women who were forced to become sex slaves to the Japanese army during World War II.

What This 101 Year Old Comfort Woman Victim Said Waking Up From Sleep Brings Korea To Tears

Not only did the media point out Dahyun’s shirt, they also brought up the time MONSTA X‘s Jooheon wore the same shirt as Jimin.

monsta x japan shirt

Japanese netizens voiced their opinions against Korean celebrities, as they demanded that NHK cancel TWICE’s appearance and for Japan to stop allowing Korean celebrities to promote in Japan.

  • “These days, I don’t want to hear one word related to Korea. Why are they our neighbors… How are they so different from Taiwan?”
  • “Why did we let Koreans promote [in Japan] in the first place?”
  • “[TWICE] has Japanese members and they promote in Japan. They also have Japanese fans. Why are they endorsing Anti-Japanese movements?”
  • “If they hate the Japanese, then they shouldn’t come to Japan.”
  • “This has been known for a while now. How can you argue that NHK didn’t know? Korean celebrities are involved in promoting politics so we shouldn’t invite them to Japan.”
  • “The only thing we demand is for NHK to cancel their appearance.”
Source: Nate Pann (1) and (2)
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