Anti-Corruption And Civil Rights Commission May Investigate YG Entertainment And Alleged Ties To The Police

They may also look into B.I’s involvement in the 2016 drug case.

It has been brought to the attention of the Anti-Corruption and Civil Rights Commission (ACRC) that former iKON member B.I‘s past drug suspicions may have been covered up due to YG Entertainment‘s collusion with the police.

If the ACRC acknowledges the credibility of this petition, they will most likely begin an investigation on YG Entertainment and the police.

According to Newsis, B.I’s acquaintance, Mr. A, who was investigated by the police on charges of drug use in August 2016, anonymously filed this public petition with the ACRC on June 4. Mr. A was the person from B.I’s exposed chat logs.

Mr. A had apparently submitted the report to the ACRC through the lawyer, Bang Jeong Hyeon, who is known for having reported the suspicions regarding Burning Sun as well.

It has been revealed that the data submitted to the ACRC by Bang Jeong Hyeon included information that has never been exposed in the press relating to B.I’s drug case and YG’s intervention during police investigations of Mr. A 3 years ago, and collusion between YG and the police.

The persons mentioned in the public petition included B.I, YG affiliate(s) and the police.

An Insider revealed that Mr. A risked himself to report this information after seeing investigations on police collusion during the Burning Sun incident not having been properly dealt with.

Seeing that suspicions on police collusion during the Burning Sun investigations were not concluded properly, Mr. A took the risk of being punished (for drugs) and risked himself to file the petition anonymously 3 years later.

ㅡ Insider

 

If the ACRC deems the petition highly credible after reviewing it through their TF Team, the case will be forwarded to the police or prosecution.

Meanwhile, Mr. A was arrested after violating the Drug Control Act in August 2016. He stated in a police investigation that he delivered 10 doses of LSD to a location nearby B.I’s accommodations at B.I’s request on May 3, 2016. He later reversed his statement, stating that B.I asked for LSD but that he did not actually purchase it. B.I’s name was also discovered amid the client list of a drug dealer, Mr. C, who was also arrested.

Despite their confessions, however, B.I was not summoned by the police for investigation as they determined that the circumstantial evidence was not enough to summon him.

Source: Newsis
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