Jung Joon Young’s Cell Phone Contained 200,000 Text Messages And Much More Information

Everything that has been reported was only the tip of the iceberg.

Jung Joon Young’s cell phone reportedly contained 200,000 KakaoTalk messages and according to the reporter, messages about Seungri’s prostitution scandal or the police chief were only the tip of the iceberg.

On March 13, SBS reporter Kang Chung Wan revealed more information about Jung Joon Young’s KakaoTalk conversation logs on a radio program. He stated that there was much content that was simply unspeakable.

I thought very hard about how much information I should deliver. There were things that were worse than the content that has already been reported, things that are simply unspeakable.

ㅡ Kang Chang Wan

 

He explained how he was even more shocked to find out that Jung Joon Young knew the weaknesses of some of the victims and assumed that they would not be able to report him as a result.

I was even more shocked to see messages saying, “She won’t be able to report (me),” because he knew the weaknesses of some of the victims.

ㅡ Kang Chang Wan

 

There were approximately 200,000 of these KakaoTalk messages from Jung Joon Young’s phone that was delivered to the Anti-Corruption and Civil Rights Commission, the lawyer and reporter.

There were 1:1 conversations and numerous group chatrooms as well. The conversation log about ties to a high-level officer that Bang Jung Hyun mentioned on the radio is also being reviewed.

ㅡ Kang Chang Wan

 

Moreover, considering the other chatroom conversations, Kang mentioned the possibility of more victims than what was already reported.

The content we have secured is only a portion of the entire thing. And by the looks of his behavior, it does not seem like a crime that was committed during a specific time period, but rather a habitual lifestyle almost. He could may have well committed the crime until recently.

ㅡ Kang Chang Wan

 

Meanwhile, Jung Joon Young has reported to the police at 10 am (KST) on March 14 to be investigated.

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