Police Tried To Hide Evidence During Jung Joon Young’s 2016 Hidden Camera Case

Police tampered with the investigation.

It has now been revealed by SBS that the police officer who was in charge of Jung Joon Young’s case in 2016 attempted to have the evidence destroyed.

Back in 2016, Jung Joon Young was being investigated for illegally taking hidden camera videos of a woman he was with. He was cleared of all charges, due to a lack of time. His phone needed to be restored, a process which would take a long time.

Here’s Why Jung Joon Young Was Cleared of His Previous Sex Scandal Back in 2016

 

SBS reporters were able to acquire critical evidence that the investigation regarding this case was flawed, leading them to dig deeper. They discovered that the Sungdong police officer in charge requested that the digital forensics company to destroy Jung Joon Young’s phone and falsify their documents.

On August 22, 2016, the police officer called the digital forensics company, requesting for the fake letter.

“This is XXX from the Sungdong Police Station. So, there is a case that we are investigating and there is something that is a little complicated. Jung Joon Young told us that he left the data from his cell phone here. Wouldn’t it take a long time [to restore]?

Either way, he admitted to doing it himself, and we don’t have that much time, so since the phone is old and slow, could you just write us a confirmation letter saying that the data on the phone was unable to be restored, for investigation.”

— Sungdong Police Officer XXX

 

The digital forensics company responded, saying that they were unable to do such a thing.

“That is the nature of this work, so there is a procedure that we need to follow. I have to include in the letter why [the data could not be restored], so I’m not so sure about this.”

— Digital Forensics Worker

 

SBS was able to hold an interview with the police officer in question, where the police officer stated he couldn’t remember that incident well.

SBS: Was there a time where you requested the digital forensics worker to declare “the restoration was not possible” or for the worker to write a fake confirmation letter?

XXX: This is the first time I’m hearing the phrase “restoration not possible”. It’s unprecedented for the officer in charge of an investigation to ask something like that from a private company.

SBS: You didn’t make that request?

XXX: I did not. Because the forensics worker was working on it.

 

 

After providing the officer with evidence that he did indeed talk to the digital forensics company that day, the officer began to speak a bit more.

It’s true that I did make that phone call. But, the situation wasn’t so severe that I had to say something to that point, right?

I am in quite the awkward position now, right? Right now.

— Sungdong Police Officer XXX

 

Finally, the police officer confirmed that they did not receive any information from the digital forensics team.

SBS: Later on, did you receive the results from the digital forensics company?

XXX: We did not receive them.

SBS: So, do you know what content was in the phone then?

XXX: I don’t know.

 

 

Watch the full video clip below:

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