Sulli’s Haters Reveal What They Think About Their Own Malicious Comments

“It wasn’t really even hate. I didn’t tell her to die.”

The latest episode of Unanswered Questions covered Sulli‘s death in detail. While discussing the most potential cause of her death, the TV program unveiled the shocking reality behind the “hate” culture rampant in the society and especially the entertainment industry in Korea.

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As it discussed the level of online maliciousness Sulli faced as a celebrity, Unanswered Questions interviewed some of the netizens who left “hate comments” on Sulli’s Instagram. When confronted with the question as to why they wrote such hateful things, these haters reacted with blatant shamelessness which horrified, then eventually saddened, the viewers across the nation.

Hater A: You know, if this was from ten weeks ago, I would have apologized a hundred times. But I left this over a hundred weeks ago. What am I supposed to do if you want to bring it up now?
PD: But we believe this comment about her body part has a clearly malicious intention and constitutes as sexual harassment.
Hater A: So what if it does have a malicious intention? I only meant that she’s already pretty enough, so she shouldn’t do things like this that diminishes her beauty.
PD: Do you think she posed in this picture like this on purpose?
Hater A: Is there any other reason she would have taken it that way?
PD: What was the need to leave your opinion in text on her Instagram though?
Hater A: What, are you her fan or something? My comment wasn’t even to you.

Another hater, who left a sexually harassing comment about Sulli’s cleavage, argued that first of all, it was a joke, and moreover, he didn’t think his joke would have any impact on her.

This was a joke. Sulli was a girl but I thought she had a stronger spirit than a man’s. So I thought even if I leave comments like that, she would not care much. And to be honest, I think malicious comments are more like ‘Go die’… or worse. You know? I really, really doubt she had any hard time because of some sexual comments. Plus, here’s what I think about celebrities. They don’t only receive love and attention. They also have to endure malicious comments. In return, don’t they live their best lives? With good clothes, good cars, and everything nice?

— Hater B

This particular hater who attacked Sulli — for being “an attention whore” as per his comment — commented that celebrities “must bear the hate” because accepting and processing that negativity is a part of the occupation.

Yes, I called her an attention whore. But she could have admitted she was an attention whore. It wasn’t really even hate. I didn’t tell her to die. I could have cared less about her life. But how could you be a celebrity if you have such a weak spirit? You have to show yourself in front of the public.

— Hater C

Even after Sulli’s death, these haters — self-justified with this “fame comes with criticism” logic — didn’t stop. A YouTuber, by the name of Bepon, tried to go viral by uploading a video claiming that he is Sulli’s ex-boyfriend. In this since-deleted video, Bepon mourned her death and bid her goodbye. During his interview, this YouTuber suggested that celebrities who can’t handle the heat should simply leave the scene altogether.

I wasn’t trying to mock Sulli or disrespect her in anyway. That video was meant for mourning. I decided to make it a little different from the rest of the tribute videos. I didn’t think it would become that big of a deal. I do have something I want to say about malicious comments though, can I share my thoughts? I don’t think it’s cool for celebrities to become emotional over hate comments. It comes with the fame, so they have to deal with it I think. Like honestly, if you’re going to be so butthurt about hate comments, then maybe choose a different occupation. Don’t be a celebrity.

— YouTuber Bepon

After the episode aired, Koreans have found themselves speechless and so utterly disgusted by these haters’ reasons behind how their most malicious comments are not at all responsible for Sulli’s — and other celebrities’ — broken hearts.

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